Sermons

 

 

 

 

The video above includes the full service, except for the time for sharing.

Permission to podcast/stream the music in this service obtained through One License with license A-727859.

 

Sermon | “Outside the gate by the river” 
Text: Acts 16:9-15
Speaker: Joel Miller

After a gathering last month for those preparing to join the church, Leah let me know she’d like to be baptized.  My response was that this deserves its own Sunday.  Baptism is far too rich an event to be crammed into an already rich event of hearing new members’ faith journey stories as we did two weeks ago.  After checking calendars, we settled on today. 

It was a pleasant surprise when I proceeded to peak ahead to this week’s lectionary readings and discovered the featured story: The baptism of Lydia in Acts 16.  It is one of the small but not insignificant joys of preaching when life and lectionary converge.

The practice of baptism connects us today to spiritual ancestors, through the Anabaptists...

 

 

The video above includes the full service, except for the time for sharing.

Permission to podcast/stream the music in this service obtained through One License with license A-727859.

 

Sermon: Sabbath-ing
Texts: Deuteronomy 5:1-7;12-15; Exodus 20:8-11; Mark 2:27-28
Speaker: Joel Miller

With Mark’s Sabbatical almost here, it’s a good time to revisit the role of Sabbath in all our lives.  If you’re not sure whether you have Sabbath in your life, or are pretty sure you don’t, let’s start with a broad view.

Before Sabbath was a holy day, a noun, it was a verb, with nothing especially holy about it.  To sabbath means to cease, to rest.  Verbs are action words, and sabbath is an action word meaning, basically, to refrain from action.  Sabbath is the un-verb.

The first four times the Hebrew word shabot, sabbath, appears in the Bible it is in verb form.  It’s mentioned twice in Genesis 2, where the Creator Elohim famously and somewhat mysteriously ceases, rests, sabbaths from all creative activity.  This...

 

 

The video above includes the full service, except for the time for sharing.

Permission to podcast/stream the music in this service obtained through One License with license A-727859.

 

Reflections | Jacqui Hoke, Ryan Hoke, Kyle Kerley, Andy Minard, Heidi Minard, Oralea Pittman, Shannon Thiebeau, Daryl Turley, and Trisha Turley 

 

 

 

The video above includes the full service, except for the time for sharing.

Permission to podcast/stream the music in this service obtained through One License with license A-727859.

 

Sermon | A common center, ever-expanding

Text: John 21:1-17
Speaker: Joel Miller

Every fall I teach an Inquirers Sunday school class.  It’s open to anyone, with a special invitation to new-ish folks.  We do an overview of Christian faith in a Mennonite perspective and look at the story of this congregation. 

One of the things we talk about is a couple different ways of forming community.  One focuses on strong boundaries, the other focuses on a strong center.  If you’ve been part of that class, this will sound familiar. 

In a community with strong boundaries, there’s a pretty clear line between who’s in and who’s out.  Or at least what you need to do to be in, and stay in.  In congregations this often comes down to a set of beliefs and a few moral issues.  The key is whether a personal can...

The video above includes the full service, except for the time for sharing.

Permission to podcast/stream the music in this service obtained through One License with license A-727859.

Sacred Work

Scripture: John 20:19-29

(Sermon by Mark Rupp)

Last Sunday while I was worship leading, I mentioned that Easter is not just a day, but a season.  It is a season on the liturgical calendar that extends through Pentecost and invites us to ask the “so what?” questions about the resurrection that we celebrate on Easter day. 

So what?  These questions about what Easter–what the resurrection–means for us today are questions that we ask all year long.  In fact, if you’ve ever done the math about how Lent is supposed to represent the 40 days Jesus spent in the wilderness, you may have noticed that on the calendar, Lent lasts longer than 40 days.  This is because Sundays don’t count toward those 40 days of repentance and contemplating our mortality.  Every Sunday is meant to be a kind of “mini-Easter” celebration. 

I’ll let you decide...

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