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Can you really be sorry for something you’ve done, if you won’t take responsibility for repairing –or at least trying to repair--the damage?

Think about a person who’s done something to hurt you –something pretty significant.  If you tell them what you need from them to repair the harm they’ve caused, and they ignore your response, are they really sorry? Or, maybe they acknowledge your words, but make no good faith effort to do anything. Or, what if they forget what you asked them to do?—forget that you even ever asked: Are they really sorry?...

Today, March 17, the IRS is releasing billions of dollars in stimulus money that will appear in bank accounts of American households.  I checked this morning and ours is already there.  That was fast.  This will be a lifeline for many who are out of work or behind on bills or have always struggled to keep up with basic living costs, or all of the above.  The flood of cash will no doubt stimulate the economy. 

For those of us in a more stable economic situation, perhaps it can also stimulate generosity.  Perhaps this giving takes the form of a stimulus tithe (10%), a nice round...

I often hear comments along these lines, “I bet you meet all kinds in your line of business.” Here is the story of the only time that I have ever “fired” a client.

In 2016 someone called the CMC office and asked if there happened to be a Mennonite REALTOR® in the congregation. Gwen or Mim gave them my number. When I got the phone call, the voice on the other end told me that they were looking to build a house, “on ten acres, in a Mennonite community, and preferably in Bexley.” They were not Mennonite, but knew that we were “good people.”...

What is one story from your family lineage that impacts how you think about repair for future generations?

I rummaged through my stock of family stories to find something fitting this prompt.  I climbed through my dad’s family tree, testing several thin branches, then shinnied into my mom’s where some colorful characters perched, before returning to the first tree and remembering that my dad’s sister Virginia worked in an insurance agency where Theodore S. Geisel was a client.   Yes, my aunt knew Dr. Seuss – maybe when he was writing...

Imagine that you are black and living in a small, tight-knit neighborhood near an old coal mine where about 4 or 5 families have inhabited a group of 25-30 houses for the better part of the last 75 years. Imagine that the city surrounding you was growing and expanding its municipal services. For the last 50 of those 75 years, clean running water has been extended to all of the neighbors surrounding you. While you asked – BEGGED – to be hooked into the new lines, you were denied. Meanwhile, the more expensive, more white, developments get annexed into the city with water...

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