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As far as I can tell, the only cross regularly displayed in our sanctuary is on the front of the pulpit, two thin lines that can, depending on the light, blend in with the grain of the wood in which they’re cut. 

That’s about to change.

Our Lenten worship theme this year is “The Cross and…”  Each week we’ll be meditating on the cross from a different perspective – how it has been understood, and misunderstood, and what this freighted symbol Christians claim might have to say to us these days.

This will include a different cross-related image projected on the banner...

One thing feeding my soul in 2020 has been David Whyte’s little book Consolations: The Solace, Nourishment and Underlying Meaning of Everyday Words.  If you are a lover of language, or just someone who uses it occasionally, it is soooooo good.  He takes 52 ordinary words, presenting a several page meditation on each.  Here is a taste:

Anger is the deepest form of compassion, for another, for the world, for the self, for a life, for the body, for a family and for all our ideals, all vulnerable and all, possibly...

The cover story in the March edition of The Atlantic is titled, “The Nuclear Family Was a Mistake.”  This five minute video with author David Brooks gives a summary.

Brooks’ basic argument is that the nuclear family – a household consisting of two married parents living with their children – rather than being the norm for human thriving, was a freakish aberration that peaked in...

If you missed our Winter Seminar a few weeks ago, you missed out on some great conversations about practical ideas for how we as individuals and as a congregation can practice care for Creation.  Amy Huser, the Sustainability and Outdoor Education Director  from Camp Friedenswald, led the seminar on Saturday and preached on Sunday morning. 

During the Sunday morning service, Amy invited everyone to write down their own commitments to Creation Care and place them in the offering.  I have compiled those offerings, and I wanted to pass them along both as a reminder of the things we...

The lead essay of the most recent The Christian Century magazine names “10 religious trends of the 2010’s,” written by Baylor University professor of history Philip Jenkins.  There’s actually quite a bit of good news amidst the trouble.  Here they are in the order he presents them, roughly chronologically in their emergence.

The rise of the nones: US adults naming their religious affiliation as “none” is up from 15% in 2007 to 26% today, making them a...

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